Teaching

 

 

 

Course:           Math 110.311

 

                        Methods of Complex Analysis

 

Fall Semester, 2019, Tuesday and Thursday, 12:00 – 1:15

Krieger 309

 

Dr. Benjamin Dodson

Email: bdodson4@jhu.edu

Office : 214 Krieger Hall

 

Office Hours:              Tuesday and Thursday at 10:30 – 12:00

 

Grading:                      Homework 20%

                                    First midterm 40%

                                    Second midterm 40%

 

 

Text:               Fundamentals of Complex Analysis with Applications to Engineering and Science, Third Edition. E.B. Saff and A.D. Snider. (511 pages)

 

Schedule:        

 

September 3     Complex numbers and the complex plane

September 5     The complex exponential

September 10      Analytic functions, part 1

September 12      Analytic functions, part 2

September 17        Harmonic functions

September 19                    Polynomials and rational functions

September 24                    Riemann sphere and stereographic projection

September 26                  Exponential, trigonometric, and hyperbolic functions

October 1                    Contour integrals

October 3                      Goursat’s theorem

October 8                                   class

October 10                                 class

October 15                                 class

October 17                                 First midterm

October 22                                 class

October 24                                 class

October 29                                 class

October 31                                 class

November 5                                class

November 7                                class

November 12                              class

November 14                              class

November 19                              class

November 21                              class

December 3                                 class

December 5                                 Second midterm


Homework:

Due September 12, 1.1 - 9, 16; 1.2 - 7, 11; 1.3 - 5, 13, 19; 1.4 - 11, 12; 1.5 - 6, 7, 9

Due September 19, 2.3 - 7, 8; 2.4 - 2, 6

Due September 26, 3.1 - 1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17

Due October 3, 3.2 - 3, 5, 11; 3.3 - 5, 7, 9

Due October 10, 4.2 - 3, 5, 6, 12; 4.3 - 1, 5

Due October 31, 4.6 - 9; 5.1 - 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 11, 12

Due November 7, 5.2 - 1, 2, 4, 5, 12, 15 ; 5.3 - 3, 5, 12

Due November 19, 5.6 - 1, 2, 5, 7, 10, 11, 12, 17

 

 

Course Policy: You are responsible for lecture notes, any course material handed out, and attendance in class.  While I will not formally record your attendance, I will get to know you and your rate of presence over time.

 

Help Room:      213 Kreiger Hall.  The hours are 9am  9pm on Monday through Thursday, and 9am  5pm on Friday.  This free service is a very valuable way to get one-on-one help on the

current material of a class from other students outside the course.  It is staffed by graduate students and advanced undergraduates.


Ethics Statement:  The strength of the university depends on academic and personal integrity. In this course, you must be honest and truthful.  Cheating is wrong. Cheating hurts our community by undermining academic integrity, creating mistrust, and fostering unfair competition. The university will punish cheaters with failure on an assignment, failure in a course, permanent transcript notation, suspension, and/or expulsion. Offenses may be reported to medical, law, or other professional or graduate schools when a

cheater applies. 
Violations can include cheating on exams, plagiarism, reuse of assignments without permission, improper use of the Internet and electronic devices unauthorized collaboration, alteration of graded assignments, forgery and falsification, lying, facilitating academic dishonesty, and unfair competition. Ignorance of these rules is not an excuse. 
In this course, as in many math courses, working in groups to study particular problems and discuss theory is strongly encouraged.  Your ability to talk mathematics is of particular importance to your general understanding of mathematics.
You should collaborate with other students in this course on the general construction of homework assignment problems.  However, you must write up the solutions to these homework problems individually and separately.  If there is any question as to what this statement means, please see the professor or the recitation instructor.
For more information, see the guide on "Academic Ethics for Undergraduates" and the Ethics Board web site (http://ethics.jhu.edu). 

 

Students with Disabilities:  Students with documented disabilities or other special needs that require accommodation must register with the Office of Academic Advising. After that, remind me

of your needs at least 5 days prior to each exam; we will need to have received confirmati

on from Academic Advising.